Who’s in the Driver’s Seat?

Welcome back to A New Map for Relationships’ blog. We’ve been quiet for a long time, but here we are … still trying to “create true love at home and peace on the planet” as the subtitle of our book* says. Yesterday, we were talking with some...

More on How You Can Help Prevent a Second Korean War

More on How You Can Help Prevent a Second Korean War

Preventable War. How you can work most effectively in this critically needed effort.

Our last post described how just 600 motivated voters helped get the New START arms control treaty passed in 2010, and asked you to work in a similar way to help prevent a second Korean War. There has been good news in the two weeks since that post. We are writing now to relay that news and provide more details on how you can work most effectively in this critically needed effort.

Help Prevent a Second Korean War!

Help Prevent a Second Korean War!

Get the Washington, DC phone numbers for your representative and senators.

We are writing to ask you to help prevent a second Korean War by supporting a critically needed bill that will prevent President Trump from attacking North Korea without Congressional approval. Your ability to have that big an impact may sound farfetched, so we’ll start with some background showing how just 600 Georgia voters helped get the New START arms control treaty passed in 2010. This is described in endnote 149 of our book (click for free PDF):

Believing Our Own BS

Believing Our Own BS

Six former, high government officials write for top priority diplomacy.

In business, a company gets into trouble when it starts believing its own BS. The same is true for a nation, except there “bankruptcy” can mean war, possibly nuclear. To prevent needless wars and ultimately to save the planet, we as a nation need to stop believing our own BS. The seven international case studies in our book provide many examples (click for free PDF and see pages 169-223), and recent articles in TIME and the New York Times highlight the problem, unfortunately by example, not by correcting the problem.